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SJCX
02-22-2014, 08:35 AM
I don't know if this is the right place but here is my question

I have about 300k in my TSP, I'm 43 and plan to retire at 62. I'm 100% S fund and contribute the max 17500.00 a year.

I've used calculators that are all over the place so can I get an estimate of my TSP balance at 62?

Y2KBug
02-22-2014, 10:27 AM
I don't know if this is the right place but here is my question

I have about 300k in my TSP, I'm 43 and plan to retire at 62. I'm 100% S fund and contribute the max 17500.00 a year.

I've used calculators that are all over the place so can I get an estimate of my TSP balance at 62?

I just use those on the TSP Website, nothing is for sure when you buy and hold the S Fund. I'd recommend sigining up for Intrepid Timer's Service on here and make some good money with his help. Good luck! :)

tsptalk
02-22-2014, 11:24 AM
A friend of mine wrote and gave me this program years ago and I posted on the utilities page for people to download and use. I have no idea if it is even still working, but it was designed to do just what your asking.

Go to this page and scroll the bottom half and you will see something called, Financial Futures.

TSP Calculator - Thrift Savings Plan (http://www.tsptalk.com/utilities.html)

Use the "Run Program" link. I just tried it and I got a couple of weird messages, probably because it is is such an old program, but it did work.

Cactus
02-22-2014, 11:53 AM
It's not magic. Your estimate are all over the place because they depend on the numbers going in. For example, you can use a simple spreadsheet to calculate the Future Value on an initial balance of 300K with constant annual additions of 17.5K after 19 years (43 to 62) for any given annualized interest rate. I think TSP uses 4%. Using a spreadsheet, I couldn't get to attach, I came up with the following estimates:

at 4% 1.1 Million
at 7% 1.8 Million
at 10% 2.9 Million

The spreadsheet breaks it down by whether the addition is added annually, monthly, bi-weekly, but it is all just an estimate. Also don't forget about inflation. A million dollars won't buy you as much in 19 years.